Andrew Chongseh Kim
  • Attorneys

Andrew Chongseh Kim

Of Counsel

Andrew Chongseh Kim joined Beck Redden after several years as a law school professor, teaching at both Concordia University School of Law and Washington University in St. Louis School of Law. His research, which has been published in top-100 law reviews and cited in briefs to the United States Supreme Court, applied sophisticated statistical techniques to reveal important insights into our legal system. His ability to connect with students and communicate complex ideas with clarity earned him the title of “Professor of the Year.” He has been quoted frequently in newspapers, radio, and online media outlets. Now, Andrew is excited to apply his sharp legal mind and strong communication skills on behalf of his clients.

Andrew graduated from cum laude from Harvard Law School where he served as a General Editor on the Harvard Civil Rights – Civil Liberties Law Review and was honored as Dean’s Scholar. He clerked for Justice Richard N. Palmer of the Connecticut Supreme Court, gaining valuable insights into our judicial system.

Related Practices

Professional Activities and Memberships

Visiting Scholar, South Texas College of Law, Houston

Related News
Publications and Presentations

Prosecuting Chinese “Spies”: An Empirical Analysis of the Economic Espionage Act (forthcoming)


When the Apocalypse Comes, Will Anything Change? Gay Marriage, Black Lives Matter, and the Rule of Law, 3 Savannah L. Rev. 57 (2016) (The Walking Dead reveals the lawlessness of pre-apocalypse America)

Underestimating the Trial Penalty: An Empirical Analysis of the Federal Trial Penalty and Critique of the Abrams Study, 84 Miss. L.J. 1195 (2015) (selected through peer review) (based on multivariate regression analysis of 221,928 cases, the trial penalty is four times larger than previously reported)

Beyond Finality: How Making Criminal Judgments Less Final Can Further the “Interests of Finality, 2013 Utah L. Rev. 561 (2013) (states can realize net financial savings by providing more lenient criminal appeals)

- Cited in Ellis v. Quay, 88 F.Supp.3d 77, 84 (D. Conn. 2015); Brief of Scholars of Federal Courts and Sentencing as amici curiae, p. 23, 27, Welch v. U.S., 2016 WL 721993 (U.S.); Brief of Professor Douglas A. Berman as amicus curiae, p. 10, Montgomery v. Louisiana, 577 U.S. __ (2016); et al.

“DOJ Prosecutions of Espionage,” Asian Pacific American Justice Task Force, conference call, Sept. 26, 2016

“When the Apocalypse Comes, Will Anything Change?”, Savannah Law Review’s The Walking Dead Colloquium, Savannah Law School, Sept. 19, 2015

“Why People Plead Guilty,” Peer Review Author Colloquium SeminarUniversity of Mississippi School of Law, Nov. 3, 2014


Selected Media Appearances


What One Boise Professor Thinks We Can Learn About Zombies, Boise State Public Radio, Oct. 31, 2015 (featured interviewee)


Courtroom antics may be Bundy's plan
, THE OREGONIAN, Sept. 25, 2016, at A4

Malheur Jury Selection Begins, The Oregonian, Sept. 7, 2016, at A8


PrawfsBlawg, Guest blogger, Oct. 2015 (blog topics ranged from presidential power in the debt-ceiling standoffs to parental liability for mass shootings)

Education

J.D., Harvard Law School, cum laude, 2010

- Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties   Law Review, General Editor

- Dean's Scholar in Analytical Methods   for Lawyers

B.A., University of Chicago, Economics, Physics, Anthropology, 2000

Admissions

State Bar of Illinois